The International Symposium of Byzantine Musicology, IInd Edition:

300 years of Romanian Tradition (1713–2013)

 

       The second edition of the International Symposium of Byzantine Musicology organized by the National University of Music Bucharest and the “George Oprescu” Art History Institute of the Romanian Academy took place on December 12th, 2013, at the National University of Music Bucharest. This edition celebrated 300 years since the first musical notation manuscript of church chants in Romanian was written, collected by the Hieromonk Filothei sin Aga Jipa from the Metropolitan Church of Bucharest.
        The proceedings - The International Symposium of Byzantine Musicology, 300 years of Romanian Tradition (1713–2013), edited by Nicolae Gheorghiță, Costin Moisil and Daniel Suceava – and released by Glissando Publishing House of the National University of Music and were given to the participants on the day of the symposium. This volume comprises 26 articles by Romanian, Greek, Finnish and Macedonian researchers. The articles broach themes connected to the personality and work of Filothei sin Aga Jipa, the musical scene of the Phanariote and Brancoveanu eras, unique manuscripts and the adaptation of Byzantine chants in Romanian and Finnish, contemporary creations inspired by the Byzantine chant.
        The conference was followed by the launch of Professor Emeritus Sebastian Barbu-Bucur’s book, The Romanian Musical Heritage of the Byzantine Tradition (1713-2013). It is a series of articles on the adaptations of Byzantine chants into Romanian during the last 300 years.
        In the end, a Byzantine music concert by the Psalmodia choir of the National University of Music Bucharest was conducted by Nicolae Gheorghiţă and Gabriel Constantin Oprea; they invited also a special guest, Nectarie Protopsaltul Choir, led by Sabin Preda. The concert included seventeenth-century to twenty-first-century compositions in Romanian and Greek, by composers such as Chrysaphes the Younger, Iovaşcu Vlachos, Mihalache the Moldavian, and Sebastian Barbu-Bucur.

Nicolae Gheorghiță, Costin Moisil, Daniel Suceava